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33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A, 15 November 2020

Note: Homilies & Angelus / Regina Caeli of Pope Saint John Paul II, Pope Benedict XVI & Pope Francis I had been compiled for you after the Mass Readings below. Happy Reading!

Liturgical Colour: Green. 

 

Mass Readings from USCCB, ETWN.

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-524. 8-)

1st Reading: Proverbs 31: 10-13, 19-20, 30-31;

Responsorial: Psalm 128: 1-5;

2nd Reading: 1 Thessalonians 5:1-6;

Gospel Reading: Matthew 25: 14-30, CCTNtv, Gospel Video.

 

Register to attend Daily, Weekend Mass in Singapore: https://mycatholic.sg/register

 

Others:

Matthew Chapter 25 (video)

The Law Of Love, Total Commitment | Venerable Fulton J. Sheen

Intimacies of Love | Venerable Fulton J. Sheen

See the “Media Tweets” of @Michael65413248 (we have not endorsed on their other Retweets).  Many Thanks Michael Lewis & Friends.

 

1. Criminal Investigation Department, Singapore Police Force harassed Law-abiding Citizen. Latest!

2. See another Police case to frame against the Innocent!

Please spread the News to help them who commit no crime. Many Thanks.

Till this day, the harassment continues and there is no apology from the Rulers and no compensation paid for damages inflicted.

3. Please pray for these 2 elderly Catholic Ladies who have been victimised & harassed by their sister (also a Catholic) & her husband. Many Thanks.

4.  See the Bloggers went MISSING before / after the Singapore General Election on 10 July 2020. Please pray for their safety as we search for them actively. Many Thanks.

 

Homilies, Angelus / Regina Caeli of

 

A. Pope Saint John Paul II    

 

Angelus, 14 November 1999

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-525. 8-)

 

Angelus, 17 November 2002

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-525. 8-)

 

B. Pope Benedict XVI 

 

Angelus, 13 November 2005

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-525. 8-)

 

Angelus, 16 November 2008

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-525. 8-)

 

Angelus, 13 November 2011

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-526. 8-)

 

C. Pope Francis I 

 

Angelus, 16 November 2014

See our compilation with Pictures in Encouragements-526. 8-)

 

Homily, 19 November 2017

Extracts:

We have the joy of breaking the bread of God’s word, and shortly, we will have the joy of breaking and receiving the Bread of the Eucharist, food for life’s journey. All of us, none excluded, need this, for all of us are beggars when it comes to what is essential: God’s love, which gives meaning to our lives and a life without end. So today too, we lift up our hands to him, asking to receive his gifts.

 

The unworthy servant, despite receiving a talent from the Master who loves to share and multiply his gifts, guarded it jealously; he was content to keep it safe. But someone concerned only to preserve and maintain the treasures of the past is not being faithful to God. Instead, the parable tells us, the one who adds new talents is truly “faithful” (Matthew 25: vv. 21 and 23), because he sees things as God does; he does not stand still, but instead, out of love, takes risks. He puts his life on the line for others; he is not content to keep things as they are. One thing alone does he overlook: his own interest. That is the only right “omission”.

 

Omission is also the great sin where the poor are concerned. Here it has a specific name: indifference. It is when we say, “That doesn’t regard me; it’s not my business; it’s society’s problem”. It is when we turn away from a brother or sister in need, when we change channels as soon as a disturbing question comes up, when we grow indignant at evil but do nothing about it. God will not ask us if we felt righteous indignation, but whether we did some good.

 

How, in practice can we please God? When we want to please someone dear to us, for example by giving a gift, we need first to know that person’s tastes, lest the gift prove more pleasing to the giver than to the recipient. When we want to offer something to the Lord, we can find his tastes in the Gospel. Immediately following the passage that we heard today, Jesus says, “Truly I tell you that, just as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me” (Mt 25:40). These least of our brethren, whom he loves dearly, are the hungry and the sick, the stranger and the prisoner, the poor and the abandoned, the suffering who receive no help, the needy who are cast aside. On their faces we can imagine seeing Jesus’ own face; on their lips, even if pursed in pain, we can hear his words: “This is my body” (Matthew 26:26).

 

In the poor, Jesus knocks on the doors of our heart, thirsting for our love. When we overcome our indifference and, in the name of Jesus, we give of ourselves for the least of his brethren, we are his good and faithful friends, with whom he loves to dwell. God greatly appreciates the attitude described in today’s first reading that of the “good wife”, who “opens her hand to the poor, and reaches out her hands to the needy” (Proverbs 31:10.20). Here we see true goodness and strength: not in closed fists and crossed arms, but in ready hands outstretched to the poor, to the wounded flesh of the Lord.

 

There, in the poor, we find the presence of Jesus, who, though rich, became poor (cf. 2 Corinthians 8:9). For this reason, in them, in their weakness, a “saving power” is present. And if in the eyes of the world they have little value, they are the ones who open to us the way to heaven; they are our “passport to paradise”. For us it is an evangelical duty to care for them, as our real riches, and to do so not only by giving them bread, but also by breaking with them the bread of God’s word, which is addressed first to them. To love the poor means to combat all forms of poverty, spiritual and material.

 

And it will also do us good. Drawing near to the poor in our midst will touch our lives. It will remind us of what really counts: to love God and our neighbour. Only this lasts forever, everything else passes away. What we invest in love remains, the rest vanishes. Today we might ask ourselves: “What counts for me in life? Where am I making my investments?” In fleeting riches, with which the world is never satisfied, or in the wealth bestowed by God, who gives eternal life? This is the choice before us: to live in order to gain things on earth, or to give things away in order to gain heaven. Where heaven is concerned, what matters is not what we have, but what we give, for “those who store up treasures for themselves, do not grow rich in the sight of God” (Luke 12:21).

 

So let us not seek for ourselves more than we need, but rather what is good for others, and nothing of value will be lacking to us. May the Lord, who has compassion for our poverty and needs, and bestows his talents upon us, grant us the wisdom to seek what really matters, and the courage to love, not in words but in deeds.

Pope Francis I (Homily, 19 November 2017)

 

Angelus, 19 November 2017

Extracts:

This parable helps us understand how important it is to have a true concept of God. We must not think that he is a cruel, hard and severe master who wishes to punish us. If this mistaken image of God is within us our life cannot be fruitful, because we will live in fear and this will not lead us to anything constructive. On the contrary, fear paralyzes us; it causes our self-destruction. We are called to reflect in order to discover what our idea of God really is. Already in the Old Testament he revealed himself as “a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness” (Exodus 34:6). And Jesus always showed us that God is not a severe or intolerant master, but a father full of love, of tenderness, a father full of goodness. Therefore, we can and must have immense faith in him.

 

Jesus shows us God’s generosity and care in so many ways: with his words, with his gestures, with his welcome toward everyone, especially toward sinners, the little ones and the poor, as today — the first World Day of the Poor — also reminds us. But he also does so with his admonitions, which show his interest so that we do not pointlessly waste our life. Indeed, it is a sign that God has great esteem for us: this awareness helps us to be responsible people in all our actions. Therefore, the Parable of the Talents reminds us of a personal responsibility and of a faithfulness that even becomes the ability to continually set out anew, walking new paths, without “burying the talent”, that is, the gifts which God has entrusted to us, and for which he will call us to account.

 

May the Blessed Virgin intercede for us, so that we may remain faithful to the will of God, cultivating the talents that God has given us. Thus we will be helpful to others and, on the last day, we will be welcomed by the Lord, who will invite us to take part in his joy.

Pope Francis I (Angelus, 19 November 2017)

 

Feast of the Dedication of the Lateran Basilica – See Encouragements-522 –524.

 

Homilies 2020

 

Angelus / Regina Caeli 2020

 

Audiences 2020

 

Daily Blessings to You from Emmanuel Goh & Friends

 

 

Note: This webpage has many hyperlinks to the Vatican Webpage. The above extracts were compiled for your easy reading.

This Publication is aimed to encourage all of Goodwill around the World. It is not for business or profit purposes but it is our way to thank our Creator for His continuous blessings!

 

Compiled on 13 November 2020, 8:55 SGT

 

 

 

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